Ararat (2002) 1080p YIFY Movie

Ararat (2002) 1080p

People tell stories. In Toronto, an art historian lectures on Arshile Gorky (1904 -1948), an Armenian painter who lived through the Armenian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire. A director invites the historian to help him include Gorky's story in a film about the genocide and Turkish assault on the town of Van. The historian's family is under stress: her son is in love with his step-sister, who blames the historian for the death of her father. The daughter wants to revisit her father's death and change that story. An aging customs agent tells his son about his long interview with the historian's son, who has returned from Turkey with canisters of film. All the stories connect.

IMDB: 6.20 Likes

  • Genre: Drama | War
  • Quality: 1080p
  • Size: 1.92G
  • Resolution: 1920*1072 / 24 fpsfps
  • Language: English 2.0  
  • Run Time: 115
  • IMDB Rating: 6.2/10 
  • MPR: R
  • Peers/Seeds: 6 / 10

The Synopsis for Ararat (2002) 1080p

People tell stories. In Toronto, an art historian lectures on Arshile Gorky (1904 -1948), an Armenian painter who lived through the Armenian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire. A director invites the historian to help him include Gorky's story in a film about the genocide and Turkish assault on the town of Van. The historian's family is under stress: her son is in love with his step-sister, who blames the historian for the death of her father. The daughter wants to revisit her father's death and change that story. An aging customs agent tells his son about his long interview with the historian's son, who has returned from Turkey with canisters of film. All the stories connect.


The Director and Players for Ararat (2002) 1080p

[Director]Atom Egoyan
[Role:]Brent Carver
[Role:]Charles Aznavour
[Role:]Simon Abkarian
[Role:]Eric Bogosian


The Reviews for Ararat (2002) 1080p


Propaganda? Did we see the same movie?Reviewed bytrurl-1Vote: 10/10

I just read the review showing at the bottom of the page for "Ararat" and could not believe that the writer and I saw the same movie. The film-within-a-film structure and the exchanges between the historian (Khanjian) and one of the producers should have given most viewers a clue that the movie was about how movies such as the "film-within-a-film" take great liberties with historical sources and spin a story that does not resemble any actual events. The film-within-the-film was propaganda. But the way that Egoyan shows how biased people can distort already questionable sources to create an alternate reality that some may mistake for fact should make this film required viewing for history students.

Some of the exchanges between the "actors" made clear the disagreements. The Turkish actor (portrayed by a Greek, there's an irony) and the Armenian teenager argued over the historical sources and veracity of the events. The historian pointed out that one could not see Mt. Ararat from the village where the film-within-a-film takes place. The producer's answer--that the mountain has such a powerful significance for "our" people--makes a nice metaphor demonstrating that some people are willing to move mountains in the name of "artistic license" while flushing truth and accuracy down the toilet.

Egoyan's movies are not easy to view. They require attention and sometimes feel more like lectures than entertainment. You need to walk into the theater expecting this otherwise you will most likely walk out disappointed (and possibly bitter and angry and/or halfway through).

GenocideReviewed byjotix100Vote: 8/10

"Ararat", directed brilliantly by Atom Egoyan, is a film that will resonate with both parties that were involved in that long forgotten page of history that the world never seems to talk about. The sad story of that shameful incident is the basis of Mr. Egoyan's film.

The action takes place in a film that Edward Saroyan is filming about the genocide. At another level we see an Armenian historian, Ani, lecture about what really happened. Ani's son is in love with his step-sister, something that seems repugnant to the mother. Celia, the object of Raffi's love, keeps showing up wherever Ani speaks to shame her.

On another level, we see the how Raffi, having returned from a trip to Turkey is being interviewed by a Customs officer at the airport. We realize Raffi doesn't want to have the sealed film reels examined by the wise inspector. Their conversation go back and forth as one learns the truth.

This multi layered film has the rich texture only a director like Atom Egoyam could give it. He is at his best, as he clearly proves in his direction. Arsinee Khanjian, plays Ani with such fire that she smolders the screen any time one sees her. Ms. Khanjian is one of the best interpreters of her husband's work. Her expressive face shows what clearly is going in her mind at any given moment.

The rest of the cast responds well to the director's guidance. David Alpay, Christopher Plummer, Marie-Josee Croze, Elias Koteas, Eric Bogosian, Charles Aznavour and Bruce Greenwood, a veteran actor of some of Mr. Egoyan's films, do excellent acting in the film.

The only problem for most viewers seem to involve not having any background to the tumultuous time the film depicts, thus making it a bit unapproachable. "Ararat", like "Hotel Rwanda" and films that have captured the human suffering, is a film to treasure.

Egoyan on Spielberg territoryReviewed bymanuel-pestalozziVote: 3/10

I am sorry to say that this movie disappointed me sorely. Atom Egoyan made his name with quiet movies with a lot of intimacy. In this case there is an over abundance of characters who ALL have their own story to tell and their own onions to fry. The noble cause of the movie, remembering the genocide of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire during World War I, suffers from a unnecessarily convoluted script that does not really work and too many secondary stories who make Ararat at times descend into the Soap Opera genre.

Egoyan departed here from the style of his earlier movies and moved into an epic mode of storytelling which reminds me of Steven Spielberg blockbusters who always remain on the surface of issues and address people's emotions rather than their intelligence. Probably this happened because he wanted to reach a wider audience who is ignorant of the historic facts recounted in the movie. But then, why the many disorienting shifts in time, why the focusing on individual memories, why the inclusion into the narrative of terroristic acts against Turkish officials half a century after the genocide? If you do not know the historical facts, it really rather confuses than helps. I suspect that the director lacked the necessary emotional distance from the issue to tell about these tragic happenings without being hampered by personal distress. In this sense Ararat is a chance missed.

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