Man on Wire (2008) 1080p YIFY Movie

Man on Wire (2008) 1080p

Man on Wire is a movie starring Philippe Petit, Jean Fran?ois Heckel, and Jean-Louis Blondeau. A look at tightrope walker Philippe Petit's daring, but illegal, high-wire routine performed between New York City's World Trade Center's...

IMDB: 7.81 Likes

  • Genre: Documentary | Biography
  • Quality: 1080p
  • Size: 1.51G
  • Resolution: 1920*1080 / 23.976 fpsfps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 94
  • IMDB Rating: 7.8/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 0 / 0

The Synopsis for Man on Wire (2008) 1080p

On August 7, 1974, , a French wire walker, juggler, and street performer days shy of his 25th birthday, spent 45 minutes walking, dancing, kneeling, and lying on a wire he and friends strung between the rooftops of the Twin Towers. Uses contemporary interviews, archival footage, and recreations to tell the story of his previous walks between towers of Notre Dame and of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, his passions and friendships, and the details of the night before the walk: getting cable into the towers, hiding from guards, and mounting the wire. It ends with observations of the profound changes the walk's success brought to Philippe and those closest to him.


The Director and Players for Man on Wire (2008) 1080p

[Director]James Marsh
[Role:]Annie Allix
[Role:]Jean-Louis Blondeau
[Role:]Jean Fran?ois Heckel
[Role:]Philippe Petit


The Reviews for Man on Wire (2008) 1080p


a fascinating and even wondrous man caught in a beautiful movie, not just documentaryReviewed byMisterWhiplashVote: 10/10

I went to see Man on Wire with my mother and a friend, and after it my mother said simply "something like this will never happen again." Meaning not so much that someone won't try something death-defying or crazy like walking a tight rope somewhere or climbing up a building (matter of fact that still happens in Manhattan as recently as a couple of months back), but that this sort of situation- a man going across something as perilous and unique as the Twin Towers- is based in a film that preserves his story like so. Philippe Petit was already a tight-rope walker who did some crazy stunts (i.e. crossing Notre Dame's stretch of space in Paris), but this was his crowning achievement which, oddly enough, didn't quite get the kind of buzz the film might depict; the day of Petit's walk across the towers, Nixon resigned from the presidency.

Just a simple profile on the man might be enough, and hearing this artist (however "French" he might get in saying that it's like poetry, which maybe it is for all I know) is something to behold as a figure who sees himself as a rebel but not without some reason or in what he does. But Marsh's magnificence is first to actually make us forget, just a second, that the towers are no longer with us; it's never mentioned in the film that they're gone, so the lingering absence is all the more troubling once remembered by the viewer. One is left with the purity of this on-the-surface stunt that becomes akin to a bank robbery to Petit, as he plans and spies on the site and forms a 'crew' to do the job of sneaking up to the top level and for three days continuing to stay elusive (even going under a tarp for hours on end with a co-hort to hide from guards) while attaching the cables- which also, at one point, nearly falls apart as a plan.

Then, second, Marsh reveals himself as good as a director of dramatization in a documentary I've seen since Errol Morris; perhaos even more daring with his black and white photography of what starts as a sneak-in (watch for fake sideburns on the actors), then transforms into a full-blown noir with beautiful lighting and exterior shots of the building and other angles that just stun the crap out of a viewer not expecting such artistry. In a sense Marsh is attempting something as daring as Petit, only by way of telling the story, however non-linearly, in a manner that should get his DP an academy nomination (if, of course, the academy ever got wise to nominate for cinematography for a documentary). And, on top of this, despite knowing partially the outcome- mainly, of course, that Petit lived to tell his tale to the camera as did his (once) friends and lover- it's still thrilling and even suspenseful to see all of this buildup if one isn't entirely researched on the details.

But it's not just about the build-up and execution of that tight-rope walk, although when Marsh gets the chance to show his subject walking across this or other examples he puts it to beautiful, heart-aching music that transcends the material just enough. The man himself, and the people who knew and/or worked under him, takes up most of the time in the story. Petit is a curious fellow who can ramble like any energetic and, obviously, passionate Frenchman, and confesses how he's always been a climber since a child and loves the aspect of showmanship when he can (when not wire walking, he juggles and rides a unicycle, a lovely if strange clown).

We also see his effect on others, like his friend Jean-Louis who co-planned the WTC project, and his lover Annie Alix who found him irrisistable and barely spent a moment worrying what would happen to him. And then there's the assorted 'characters', like in any good noir, that spring up as entertaining and interesting both in present and retrospect form; even a guy with one of those *real* twirling moustaches comes forward and talks, as well as one particular member of the crew who spent 35 years smoking pot and also during the WTC job (Marsh has a wonderful way of sort of 'introducing' them as well, in a walk-in profile and name tag). Hearing them expound about the mechanics of the job, and of Petit's personality and effect on them all, for better or worse as a kind of partially blind optimist, is also a major part of the appeal in Man on Wire.

While Marsh possibly leaves out some possibly intriguing details about Petit after this job ends (save for the immediate details about his sentence and a brief, Clockwork Orange-filmed 'fling' with a local girl), and here and there finding him or even the film pretentious isn't out of the question, so much of it is alive and enthralling and even spiritual to a certain degree that I could forigve most of its possible faults. Just seeing some of that 8mm and film footage, shot at the practice sites, and the stills of Petit's walk late in life, is something that's hard to even put into words how to feel. I'm almost reminded of the wonder one feels when seeing the physically demanding art of Jean-Cristo, who also finds specific locations to pursue his craft. You can't say it specifically, but you know it's art, as is Marsh's film itself.

An Excellent Documentary...Reviewed bypopbunkaVote: 8/10

This is a really great documentary. It's a "Tour de Force of Will". The energy that Petit shows even in his old age is inspiring. I was hungry for more information and sad when it finished. I would have loved to know a little more about all of the principal players and what they are up to now.

It is really quite something to imagine a time when this kind of feat was even possible. Obviously, times have changed a lot since the early seventies and we all understand the unspoken appeal of this whole story, but at the end of this documentary I kind of felt a little sad that our world has become a place where things like this are essentially impossible to pull off nowadays and amazed that this guy and his gang of buddies did it.

Outstanding psychological journeyReviewed byrabbitmoonVote: 10/10

For me, this is what cinema is all about, and this film is striking in that it encapsulates so much in a documentary. Man On Wire has more suspense, thrills, wonder, imagination, human spirit and inspiration than any other film I have seen in recent years. The music, composition and photography, structure and editing are all superb. Some of the shots are simply breathtaking. Some scenes in the film are incredibly atmospheric, and they will be forever burned in your mind. The film captures a human sense of achievement, drive and determination better than any other film I know. Heres the ultimate proof of this films power - the audience didn't shift until a good couple of minutes into the credits.

Man on Wire (2008) 1080p Related Movies

Venom (2018) 1080p Poster

Venom (2018) 1080p

Tale of a Lake (2016) Poster

Tale of a Lake (2016)

William Shatner's Gonzo Ballet (2009) 1080p Poster

William Shatner's Gonzo Ballet (2009) 1080p

Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen (2019) 1080p Poster

Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen (2019) 1080p

Creed II (2018) 1080p Poster

Creed II (2018) 1080p

Charles Lloyd - Arrows Into Infinity (2014) Poster

Charles Lloyd - Arrows Into Infinity (2014)

Nicky's Family (2011) Poster

Nicky's Family (2011)

Primitive London (1965) Poster

Primitive London (1965)